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Center on Capital & Social Equity

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July 25th 2017
July 25th 2017
<p>OK, repeal the ACA…Which version are we voting on?<br/></p>

OK, repeal the ACA…Which version are we voting on?

July 25th 2017
July 25th 2017
July 25th 2017
July 25th 2017
July 25th 2017
July 25th 2017
July 25th 2017

CCSE: A compromise on health legislation

kpolzer:

Objective: cover more people at little or no cost to federal government with least disruption of health markets and programs:

·      Keep provision allowing low-income people in states that haven’t expanded Medicaid to buy subsidized coverage on the exchange.

·      Suspend implementation of employer penalties, and commission a study of how their repeal might negatively impact insurance markets.  If there would be no or minimal negative impacts, repeal employer penalties (option: repeal only for companies with predominantly low-wage workers).

·      Make sure that insurers participating in exchanges are adequately compensated for risk pool they draw.

·      Beginning in 2020, reduce Medicaid Federal match by one percentage point (put half of savings in “lock box” that states can draw on in times of crisis or economic distress).

·      Beginning in 2022, reduce Medicaid Federal match by one additional percentage point (put half of savings in “lock box” that states can draw on in times of crisis or economic distress).

(Note: When drafting, be careful to reduce the FMAP by “percentage points” rather than “percent.”   No tricks to advantage larger, wealthier states with more power and expertise in the legislative arena.)

July 24th 2017

Include Everyone in the Retirement Savings  System

Related initiatives and proposals:

If you know of other proposals along these lines or would like to comment, please go the "Contact Us" page on this site and send us an email. 

CCSE Proposes Universal Starter IRAs

Crowley Bill Would Establish National Retirement Savings System

Rep. Joe Crowley (D-Queens, the Bronx), Vice Chair of the Democratic Caucus, introduced legislation (H.R.5731) on July 12 that would require employers of 10 of more that don't offer retirement plans to establish and help fund individual retirement accounts for employees.  Employees would be required to contribute, as well, but could opt out of the program if they chose.  

Investment options would be similar to those available to federal employees.  Tax credits would be available to help small employers bear the cost, but the bill does not go as far as having the government contribute to low-wage workers' accounts.   

The retirement savings bill is the congressman's  latest step in attempting to realize his “Building Better Savings, Building Brighter Futures” plan to address the savings and retirement crisis in the United States. Reps. Crowley and Keith Ellison (D-MN) introduced legislation in November 2015 to set up a long-term savings account for every American child.  That bill also would expand the Child Tax Credit in order to give low-income families the opportunity to contribute to the savings accounts.

Australia as a Model?

Australia’s “superannuation” system  requires employers to contribute a percentage of employees’ income into diversified retirement funds managed by trustees.  By 1999, 97 percent of Australia’s full-time employees and 76 percent of part-time employees were covered by the superannuation system.  Over the years, Australia has increased required contributions and continued to refine the system, which has been credited with raising levels of capital accumulation and improving retirement security.

According to a July 2016 report, the Australian superannuation system continues to broaden coverage, but may be contributing to growing wealth inequality in its current form.

CCSE Comment:  You don't have to wait for the government to act.  Start a Roth IRA for your teenager.  It's one way to help young people generate, own and manage capital.

Learning to save and invest is important.  So is learning the value of working.  Contributions to a person's IRA cannot exceed their earned income. 

One problem is that most financial institutions are not interested in handling small starter accounts because they lose money on them.  However, some financial institutions don't have minimum balance requirements though they may impose fees that could be considered high relative to small balances.  To begin investing for retirement, either for oneself or to help a young person get started, someone could establish a Roth IRA or a brokerage account with a very small balance.

Another potential strategy could be starting a myRA account with the U.S. Treasury (once this new program is fully operational). Money put a myRA is invested in a special type of Treasury bond at a modest, but guaranteed, interest rate; these accounts are designed to later be rolled over into Roth IRAs, which offer more investment choices. Roth IRAs are tax-favored vehicles in which to build retirement savings -- and they can also be used to pay for college. 

Half nearing 65 have no retirement savings: GAO

Many older households without retirement savings have few other resources, such as a defined benefit (DB) plan or nonretirement savings, to draw on in retirement, according to the analysis by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. For example, among households age 55 and older, about 29 percent have neither retirement savings nor a DB plan, which typically provides a monthly payment for life.

Households that have retirement savings generally have other resources to draw on, such as non-retirement savings and DB plans. Among those with some retirement savings, the median amount of those savings is about $104,000 for households age 55-64 and $148,000 for households age 65-74, equivalent to an inflation-protected annuity of $310 and $649 per month, respectively. Social Security provides most of the income for about half of households age 65 and older.

GAO finds disparity in retirement savings

In a May 2016, GAO reported that about 25 percent of working, low-income households had any savings in a DC plan compared to 81 percent of working, high-income households. 

Sixty percent of households (including 44 percent of working households) without any DC savings in 2013 may result from several factors. About 39 percent of working households lacked access to, or were not eligible to participate in, an employer-sponsored DC plan at their job in 2013. Low-income households and Black and Hispanic households were even less likely to have access to a DC program at their workplaces or to have DC savings. 

CBO report shows growing divergence of wealth between those at the top and bottom

The distribution of wealth among the nation’s families was more unequal in 2013 than it had been in 1989, according a Congressional Budget Office report released August 2016. "For instance, the difference in wealth held by families at the 90th percentile and the wealth of those in the middle widened from $532,000 to $861,000 over the period (in 2013 dollars). The share of wealth held by families in the top 10 percent of the wealth distribution increased from 67 percent to 76 percent, whereas the share of wealth held by families in the bottom half of the distribution declined from 3 percent to 1 percent."

In 2013, CBO reported that families in the top 10 percent of the wealth distribution held 76 percent of all family wealth, families in the 51st to the 90th percentiles held 23 percent, and those in the bottom half of the distribution held 1 percent. Average wealth was about $4 million for families in the top 10 percent of the wealth distribution, $316,000 for families in the 51st to 90th percentiles, and $36,000 for families in the 26th to 50th percentiles. On average, families at or below the 25th percentile were $13,000 in debt.

Over the period from 1989 through 2013, family wealth grew at significantly different rates for different segments of the U.S. population. In 2013, for example: The wealth of families at the 90th percentile of the distribution was 54 percent greater than the wealth at the 90th percentile in 1989, after adjusting for changes in prices. The wealth of those at the median was 4 percent greater than the wealth of their counterparts in 1989. The wealth of families at the 25th percentile was 6 percent less than that of their counterparts in 1989.

While average wealth of the bottom quarter of the distribution dropped steeply over this time period, its amount of indebtedness grew significantly.

Research shows dramatic growth of upper middle class, major shift in economic resources

An Urban Institute report published in June 2016 found that since 1979 the percentage of wealthy and upper-middle-class Americans have grown dramatically while the middle- and lower-middle class has become smaller.  The study found that "the proportion of the population in the upper middle class went from under 13 percent in 1979 to over 29 percent in 2014."

The report documents a major shift in the distribution of economic resources. "In 1979, the bottom three income groups controlled 70 percent of all incomes, and the upper middle class and rich controlled 30 percent. By 2014, this distribution shifted to 37 percent for the bottom three groups and 63 percent for the upper middle class and rich groups. The middle class alone saw its share of income decline from 46 percent in 1979 to 26 percent in 2014."   

The study divides the population into five classes. The poor and the near-poor had annual incomes from $0 to $29,999; the lower middle class, from $30,000 to $49,999; the middle class, from $50,000 to $99,999; the upper middle class, from $100,000 to $349,999; and the rich, $350,000 and up. 

Pew study shows long-term decline in size of middle class, rise in number of poor

After more than four decades of serving as the nation’s economic majority, the American middle class is now matched in number by those in the economic tiers above and below it, according to a study released in December. In early 2015, 120.8 million adults were in middle-income households, compared with 121.3 million in lower- and upper-income households combined, according to the Pew Research Center analysis of government data.  Highlights include the following:

"While the share of U.S. adults living in both upper- and lower-income households rose alongside the declining share in the middle from 1971 to 2015, the share in the upper-income tier grew more.

"Over the same period, however, the nation’s aggregate household income has substantially shifted from middle-income to upper-income households, driven by the growing size of the upper-income tier and more rapid gains in income at the top. Fully 49% of U.S. aggregate income went to upper-income households in 2014, up from 29% in 1970. The share accruing to middle-income households was 43% in 2014, down substantially from 62% in 1970.

"And middle-income Americans have fallen further behind financially in the new century. In 2014, the median income of these households was 4% less than in 2000. Moreover, because of the housing market crisis and the Great Recession of 2007-09, their median wealth (assets minus debts) fell by 28% from 2001 to 2013.

"Meanwhile, the far edges of the income spectrum have shown the most growth. In 2015, 20% of American adults were in the lowest-income tier, up from 16% in 1971. On the opposite side, 9% are in the highest-income tier, more than double the 4% share in 1971. At the same time, the shares of adults in the lower-middle or upper-middle income tiers were nearly unchanged.

"These findings emerge from a new Pew Research Center analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. In this study, which examines the changing size, demographic composition and economic fortunes of the American middle class, ‘middle-income’ Americans are defined as adults whose annual household income is two-thirds to double the national median, about $42,000 to $126,000 annually in 2014 dollars for a household of three. Under this definition, the middle class made up 50% of the U.S. adult population in 2015, down from 61% in 1971."

The Wealth Gap in America: Basic Facts

Urban Institute: Promising policies to shrink wealth inequality and racial wealth gaps

Federal asset-building subsidies disproportionately benefit high-income families that need them the least. Here are six recommendations that could help reduce wealth inequality and racial wealth disparities:

  • Limit the mortgage interest tax deduction and use the revenues to provide a credit for first-time homebuyers.
  • Establish automatic savings in retirement plans.
  • Offer matched savings such as universal children's savings accounts.
  • Reform safety net program asset tests, which can act as barriers to saving among low-income families.
  • Promote emergency savings with incentives linked to savings at tax time.
  • Reduce reliance on student loans while supporting success in postsecondary education.


Impact of Raising the Minimum Wage

Increasing the minimum wage would have two principal effects on low-wage workers, according to an analysis by the Congressional Budget Office.  Most of them would receive higher pay that would increase their family’s income, and some of those families would see their income rise above the federal poverty threshold. But some jobs for low-wage workers would probably be eliminated, the income of most workers who became jobless would fall substantially, and the share of low-wage workers who were employed would probably fall slightly.

  • Five Facts about the Minimum Wage.
  • Living Wage Calculator:  The cost of meeting basic needs varies widely depending on where you live. MIT offers an on-line tool to help determine such costs and the living wage in each county and metropolitan area in the U.S.  The site also has articles on related issues.
  • State Minimum Wage Levels:  Federal minimum wage law supersedes a state's minimum wage law if the state level is lower. In those states where the state minimum wage is greater than the federal level, the state minimum wage prevails. Two states have a minimum wage set lower than the federal minimum wage. In 29 states and DC, the state minimum wage is higher than the federal minimum. Fourteen states have a minimum wage that is the same as the federal requirement. The remaining five states have not established a minimum wage.

The Economics of Inequality

Deaton Wins Nobel Prize

"The award comes at a time when there is rising academic and popular interest in the study of inequality. Several economists, including Anthony Atkinson of the London School of Economics (who was among the leading contenders for a Nobel prize this year) and Thomas Piketty of the Paris School of Economics (who is still a bit too young for one), have published widely-read volumes on the subject over the last two years. Mr Deaton published his, The Great Escape: Health, Wealth, and the Origins of Inequality, in 2013. In it, he argued that while most people in the world have gained in terms of health and well-being from GDP growth over the last few decades, there are many groups that have missed out, particularly if on measures beyond those most commonly examined."

-- The Economist

Milanovic Explores Dynamics of Income Inequality in Age of Globalization

In “Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization,” Branko Milanovic identifies five forces pushing up inequality in the United States:

1. The increasing share of national income that accrues to owners of capital.

2. Very high and rising concentration of incomes from capital.

3. People holding high-paying jobs also often have high capital income.

4. The tendency of high-income individuals to marry each other.

5. The rising political power of the rich.

Revisiting the work of American economist Simon Kuznets, Milanovic describes how global income economy waxes and wanes in "waves" driven by economic and political forces. 

 

CBO report analyzes impact of government transfers, taxes on rising U.S. income inequality

According to the June 2016 report

"Between 1979 and 2013, all three measures of income examined in this report—market income, before-tax income, and after-tax income—became less equally distributed, based on a standard measure of inequality known as the Gini index. The increase in inequality in both before-tax and after-tax income over the 35-year period stemmed largely from a significant increase in inequality in market income, mostly because of substantial income growth at the top of the market income distribution.

"Because government transfers go predominantly to lower-income households, before-tax income (which is equal to market income plus government transfers) was more evenly distributed in each year than market income. And because higher-income households pay a larger share of federal taxes than lower-income households do, after-tax income was more evenly distributed than before-tax income.

"In each year between 1979 and 2013, government transfers reduced income inequality significantly more than the federal tax system did."


 View from the Paris School of Economics


 

Lecture Highlights:

  • The return of a patrimonial (or wealth-based) society in the Old World (Europe, Japan).
  • Inequality in America: Is the New World developing a new inequality model that is based upon extreme labor income inequality more than upon wealth inequality? Is it more merit-based, or can it become the worst of all worlds?
  • In all nations with capitalist economies examined, the poorest half of the population owns virtually no assets or is in debt.
  • In general, when the rate of growth of capital exceeds the rate of growth of the overall economy, wealth tends to concentrate.  There is no natural market mechanism to counter this tendency; a nation's degree of wealth concentration in large part is a function of public policy.

"The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger"

In this book, Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett present data making the case that countries with greater income inequality tend to have more health and social problems.  Furthermore, there is evidence that the negative effects of inequality impact not just the poor, but people at all social levels.  The Equality Trust provides slides of some of the supporting data.


This short Wall Street Journal video describes competing views of the wealth inequality issue and how to address it.

Thomas Piketty reviews Anthony Atkinson's book, Inequality: What Can Be Done? , and evaluates its prescription for Great Britain's economy.

Economists Discuss Atkinson's Ideas on Reducing Inequality

Robert Solow, the Russell Sage Foundation’s Robert K. Merton Scholar and Institute Professor Emeritus at MIT, joined New York Times columnist Paul Krugman and moderator Janet Gornick (Director of the Luxembourg Income Study Center and a former RSF Visiting Scholar) at the Foundation for a conversation on Inequality: What Can Be Done?, a new book by British inequality scholar Anthony B. Atkinson. In the book, Atkinson argues that economic inequality has reached unacceptable levels in many countries and lays out an agenda for reducing inequality. His policy proposals span five areas: technology, employment, the sharing of capital, taxation, and social security.

Columbia's Joseph Stiglitz takes on "The Great Divide"

Click on highlighted words to hear interview.

Hayek Revisited: Is Compromise Possible?

Is Friedrich Hayek's classic defense of individual liberty and economic freedom, rooted in moral tradition, just as relevant today as during World War II?  Click here to read a summary of Hayek's "The Road to Serfdom," published by Reader's Digest as that war came to an end and a new international economic order was developed. 

Today, how can monopoly power, whether wielded by corporations or government agencies, be checked while expanding economic opportunity and inclusion for all including the young, old, and those with few assets?  If Hayek could have foreseen the ability of  modern corporations to concentrate wealth and power, what policies would he recommend?       

"...Where, as in the case of sickness and accident, neither the desire to avoid such calamities nor the efforts to overcome their consequences are as a rule weakened by the provision of assistance -- where, in short, we deal with genuinely insurable risks -- the case for the state's helping to organize a comprehensive system of social insurance is very strong. ...

"(T)here is no incompatibility in principle between the state's providing greater security in this way and the preservation of individual freedom."

 --  F. Hayek, The Road to Serfdom, Chapter 9/Security  and Freedom

Business Leaders Flag Uneven Distribution of Gains as Major Barrier to Sustaining Competitiveness

According to Fortune, the Harvard Business School 2015 Survey on U.S. Competitiveness represents a shift in attitude toward the issue of income and wealth concentration. Professors Jan Rivkin and Michael Porter, and Harvard Business School Senior Fellow Karen Mills titled their report on the survey’s findings, “The Challenge of Shared Prosperity,” underscoring the surprising finding that the American and global business elite are starting to believe that income inequality is a serious threat to the country and to their businesses. They find that, “respondents remain pessimistic on balance about the likelihood that firms will lift American living standards by paying higher wages and benefits in the near term. Shared prosperity is not around the corner.”

A Life Lived in Truth

For the last eight years of Liu Xiaobo’s life, the Chinese authorities robbed him of his liberty and his dignity. But in the state-enforced silence surrounding Liu’s stage-managed death, the words of his Nobel Prize lecture ring out even louder: “Freedom of expression is the foundation of human rights, the source of humanity, and the mother of truth.”

Happy July 4!

Warren Buffett: Government Should Do More on Income Inequality - short video

"Natural forces of a market economy and capitalism will drive that disparity unless government does things to help." Buffett says EITC should be expanded so workers can have decent lives. (See CCSE article on this site about relationship of EITC and Social Security.)

Click here to watch what's happened to the middle class in U.S. cities since 1970.

Capital Accumulation, Private Property and Rising Inequality in China, 1978- 2015

Thomas Piketty, Li Yang, Gabriel Zucman

Researchers find that the share of public property in China'snational wealth has declined from about 70% in 1978 to 30% in 2015...

"The top 10% income share rose from 27% to 41% of national income between 1978 and 2015, while the bottom 50% share dropped from 27% to 15%. China’s inequality levels used to be close to Nordic countries' and are now approaching U.S. levels."

Robin Hood Tax Reform - May 2017

How Modest Changes in Health, Retirement Tax Breaks Could Produce Major Gains in US Health Access, Financial Security – at Little or No Added Government Cost

..."The positive impacts of two such changes discussed below could include 1) lowering the rate of health care cost inflation; 2) providing revenue to help subsidize health insurance for the unemployed; 3) creating seed money and a low-cost infrastructure for a universal retirement savings system; and 4) increasing retirement security for low- and middle-income people; and 5) helping people save for long-term care costs. Looking at benefit tax exclusion is already on the table as Congress faces the unsavory chore of developing a fix for the Affordable Care Act’s clumsily designed “Cadillac” health plan excise tax. Most importantly, these changes could result in greater economic fairness and inclusion."

Eyes on the Prize: Universal Health Insurance Is the Goal

Letter to the Washington Post:

Charles Krauthammer’s March 31 op-ed, “The road to single-payer health care,” was largely on point. However, it is important to separate the concepts of “single-payer,” which is a means toward a goal, and “universal coverage,” which should be the primary goal. Universal coverage can be achieved without having the government cover every citizen. Even if government programs cover most citizens, there will always be multiple payers, including individuals and taxpayers; a universal system also could allow employer plans to operate. Ironically, creating a larger government role in sponsoring and subsidizing health insurance could result in a more competitive market for providing services.   Karl Polzer - April 2, 2017

Reformed Tax Incentives Among Tools Needed To Boost Retirement Saving

David Kamin of NYU law school presents proposed changes at the Aspen Institute.

Seven ideas for curing toxic inequality

Government policy mostly helps the rich and hurts everyone else, says Brandeis scholar Thomas M. Shapiro. Here’s how we can change that.

ACA Replacement Should Meet Two Tests: CCSE

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) improved life in the United States by 1) expanding access to institutional settings (e.g., Medicaid, exchanges, individual insurance markets, job-based coverage, Medicare), where 2) Americans can buy health insurance or enroll in health plans at affordable prices based on income.  A successful ACA replacement must meet these same two tests: 1) universal (or near-universal) health insurance coverage, and 2) individual affordability.

Note: the U.S. Supreme Court created a coverage gap for low-income people by ruling that the ACA’s Medicaid expansion to adults cannot be mandatory, but requires state-by-state approval.

Center on Capital & Social Equity - January 2017

A fox to lead the hen house?  Background on Labor Secretary nominees

updated Dec. 14, 2016

Obama Signs Bipartisan Bill To Speed Miracle Cures to Market.  Who Will Have Access to the New Technology?  Who Won’t?

In a city that’s witnessed trench warfare between Congress and the White House during the last six years of the Obama Administration, this was a rare moment: a bipartisan love fest.  On Dec. 13, 2016, President Obama signed the "21st Century Cures Act," which includes expanded funding to push medical technology through the development pipeline. “We are bringing to reality the possibility of new breakthroughs to some of the greatest health-care challenges of our time,” Obama said. “It is wonderful to see how well Democrats and Republicans in the closing day of this Congress came together around a common cause.”

The legislation was backed by a coalition of interests, including the powerful pharmaceutical industry, academia, and consumer groups supporting speedier medical research.  Its few critics have mainly argued that the popular funding provisions “mask a worrisome loosening of regulations at the Food and Drug Administration that could put patients at risk.”

Hardly anyone, however, is asking the million-dollar question:  Which Americans will end up having access to new miracle cures, many of which promise to be extremely expensive?  And, who will not?  The country’s patchwork of health insurance already is rationing expensive new technology to some populations, particularly low-income people.  Congress, meanwhile, has begun a fractious debate over repealing, and possibly replacing, the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  So, while lawmakers have just put their collective foot on the technology gas pedal, they may soon slam the brakes on funding for expanded coverage, potentially throwing millions of Americans into the ranks of the uninsured...              

Traditions of Democracy

    "The tradition of Jefferson and Jackson might recede, but it could never disappear.  It was bound to endure in America so long as liberal capitalistic society endured, for it was the creation of the internal necessities of such a society.  American democracy has come to accept the struggle among competing groups for the control of the state as a positive virtue -- indeed, as the only foundation for liberty.  The business community has been ordinarily the most powerful of these groups, and liberalism in America has been ordinarily the movement on the part of other sections of society to restrain the power of the business community.  This was the tradition of Jefferson and Jackson, and it has been the basic meaning of American liberalism."  

Excerpt from Chapter 37, "The Age of Jackson," Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.

Federal Reserve researchers probe economic inequality, policies that could spread U.S. income gains

The increase in U.S. income inequality since 1970 has generated large welfare gains for households in the top 20% of the income distribution and significant welfare losses for those in the bottom 80%, according an analysis published by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.  The modeling found that some of the impact of this upward income shift was mitigated by "the dramatic rise in government redistributive transfers, which have doubled as a share of U.S. output over the same period."

The analysis concludes:  "Alternative simulations imply that a relatively modest boost in the historical growth rate of government redistributive transfers, accompanied by modestly higher average tax rates, could have achieved small but equal welfare gains for all households. Overall, our results suggest that there is room for policy actions that could offset the negative consequences of rising income inequality."

Are EITC Recipients Missing Out on Social Security?

Growing economic inequality in the United States has intensified debate over how to best improve incomes and retirement security, particularly for modest and low-income people. One way to lift incomes is through higher wages. Another way is by having taxpayers subsidize wages through the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). While Conservatives typically oppose efforts to raise the minimum wage, there has been considerable bipartisan support for the EITC, including proposals to expand tax credits available for childless workers...

June 30, 2016

Reflections on American Wealth Concentration – and What To Do About It

Just over one year ago, the Center on Capital & Social Equity (CCSE) began exploring the phenomenon of growing wealth concentration and inequality, while advocating for a more inclusive form of capitalism. Following are some general observations.

Over the past year, the issue of economic inequality in the United States has moved from the backburner to center stage. Much credit for this goes to Sen. Bernie Sanders’ attack on the “top one percent” in his run for the Democratic nomination. While there is ample reason to question many details of his proposals, Sanders’ call for an increased role for government in providing opportunity and essential services resonated with many Americans who feel they have been left out of the economic mainstream. Yet the problems posed by rising economic inequality are deeply rooted and go well beyond the disproportional gains of the top one percent. They will be harder to address than portrayed in election rhetoric and require judicious use of public resources.

Three observations can be made about economic inequality in the United States. First, income and wealth inequality have grown steadily since the 1980s, suggesting that some of the causes are structural in nature. Second, high levels of inequality increase the risk of political and economic instability. Finally, moving toward an economy that is less unequal and offers opportunity to more Americans will require major changes in public policy and shifts in spending.

Life Expectancy Gap is Large - and Expanding

The gap in life expectancy between the richest 1% and poorest 1% was 14.6 years for men and 10.1 years for women.  A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association also found that inequality in Americans' life expectancy is growing over time.

How the U.S. Retirement Savings System Magnifies Wealth Inequality

Karl Polzer, Center on Capital & Social Equity 

Economic inequality and wealth concentration have have emerged as central issues in the U.S. presidential race. While these concerns appear to have risen to the forefront quite suddenly, forces driving wealth concentration have been building for decades. As analysts probe the dynamics beneath these trends, they may find that America's shift to a defined contribution retirement system is playing an increasing role in the concentration of wealth... 

So, What Does Jesus Say about Wealth Concentration and Inequality?

Karl Polzer 

In recent years, the tendency for wealth to concentrate in the hands of a powerful few has come under scrutiny, prompting concern about growing inequality from political and religious leaders, most notably Pope Francis. While excessive wealth concentration is likely lead to greater social ills and unrest, how to rein in growing inequality is a more difficult question.  Should we move away from capitalism and the market system?  Develop a more socialist model?  Reform capitalism from inside to benefit people more equitably? ... 


Virginia's push to end veteran homelessness faces steep challenges

On Nov. 11, 2015, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced that the state was the first to "functionally" end homelessness among veterans of the U.S. armed forces.  To assist two veterans living on the street not aware of the program, the Center on Capital & Social Equity contacted the governor's office, asking how veterans can gain access to housing and other services under the collaboration involving state, federal, and local government agencies.

The Virginia Department of Veterans Services provided information (click on the button below), including contact points at the local and state levels where veterans and their advocates can begin the process of finding temporary or permanent housing.

To follow up, we contacted three Northern Virginia jurisdictions and found an array of barriers to functionally ending veteran homelessness.  These problems include lack of  knowledge on the part of local officials of the state's initiative; lack of affordable and subsidized housing resources; high housing prices; lack of shelter space (for example, Fairfax County has 1 million residents but only three homeless shelters that can't meet wintertime demand); unwillingness by many street people to seek help (for a variety of reasons); coordination issues between state and local, local and local, and federal and state and local agencies; bottlenecks like having to go through shelters to gain access to housing, when shelter space is limited; and many other factors.

While helping one of the veterans gain access to temporary shelter and services, we reported these issues back to the state officials who said they will take steps to increase awareness of the governor's initiative, including posting information about the program on a state website.  For more detail, see our correspondence with state and local officials, which can be accessed by clicking the second button below.

Let’s sell health insurance “across states lines” – through Medicare

Republicans, stop with being the party of “no.” It’s time to step up to the plate and seize the initiative on health policy...

Blasts from the Past

Playing Immigration Piñata

Deception and hypocrisy are no strangers to politics. This seems particularly true in recent incantations about illegal immigration. Republican presidential candidates – other than Jeb Bush – mostly want to round up illegals and dump them into Mexico. Donald Trump wants to spend billions to build a massive wall in the wrong place...

How Can U.S. Policy Reduce Financial Risk for the Very Old?

CCSE explores ways to reduce retirement risk and pay for long term care in Society of Actuaries monograph.

Finding:  401(k)rule changes including new "sub-accounts" could help seniors better save for needs in very old age.

Retirement Strategy:  When Should I Start Receiving Social Security Checks?

Americans can begin taking Social Security between ages 62 and 70. Waiting to take Social Security can increase the amount on your check significantly.  Collecting Social Security benefits early has the opposite effect. 

When to start depends on many factors including your life situation,  needs and plans.  Most Americans begin taking Social Security early.

The U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau offers this planning tool and other information to help people work through this decision.   

Baltimore 2015

A Dream Deferred

by Langston Hughes

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore--
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over--
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

Report on Underwater America:  The housing crisis isn't over for everyone. 

Not only did the housing crisis affect poor people the most, another study finds it led to more racial segregation.

CRS Documents Growth of U.S. Prison System, Challenges

In a recent report, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) explores the phenomenal growth of the federal prison population since the 1980s along with policy and budget challenges.  "The increasing number of federal inmates, combined with the rising per capita cost of incarceration, has made it increasingly more expensive to operate and maintain the federal prison system," according to a CRS report.  'The per capita cost of incarceration for all inmates increased from $21,603 in FY2000 to $29,291 in FY2013. During this same period of time, appropriations for the Bureau of Prisons increased from $3.7 billion to $6.5 billion."

CCSE Comment:  By reducing mandatory sentences, Congress might be able to cut prison costs significantly.   The money freed up would be better spent on helping young people learn how to generate and invest capital and teaching them to be owners of the country rather than captives.

Life Is More Than Money!

The lyrics of many songs deal with wealth, power and identity.  Here's one of our favorites.  Click a few times - you'll get there.

Still I Rise

You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may tread me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I'll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
'Cause I walk like I've got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I'll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops.
Weakened by my soulful cries.

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don't you take it awful hard
'Cause I laugh like I've got gold mines
Diggin' in my own back yard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I'll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I've got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history's shame
I rise
Up from a past that's rooted in pain
I rise
I'm a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.
Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that's wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.

Maya Angelou

Ode to the Supply Side, long-term care workers in particular:

Provide, Provide

The witch that came (the withered hag)
To wash the steps with pail and rag
Was once the beauty Abishag,

The picture pride of Hollywood.
Too many fall from great and good
For you to doubt the likelihood.

Die early and avoid the fate.
Or if predestined to die late,
Make up your mind to die in state.

Make the whole stock exchange your own!
If need be occupy a throne,
Where nobody can call you crone.

Some have relied on what they knew,
Others on being simply true.
What worked for them might work for you.

No memory of having starred
Atones for later disregard
Or keeps the end from being hard.

Better to go down dignified
With boughten friendship at your side
Than none at all. Provide, provide!

Robert Frost

The beauty Abishag

David and Abishag,  by Pedro Américo, 1879

Easter Essay: Is the Golden Rule Enough? Mathematics of the Two Great Commandments

Whether people see themselves as Christians, followers of other faiths, or atheists, all are pulled by the power of many gods: the god of money, the god of technology, the nymph of new electronic gadgets, satyrs of TV and the worldwide net, and so on. In adoration of possessions, money, and power, atheists and believers are equal -- even deeply religious in the way that Paul sarcastically described the polytheistic statuary of Athens as evidence of its faith. Some of today’s humanists and atheists are more Christian in spirit and behavior than nominal Christians. And, unlike some Christians, many have thought through their views on religion and feel they need to have moral justification they can explain. The conventional morality of good people often is a humanism expressed by the Golden Rule.

Jesus taught the Golden Rule two thousand years ago, as one of two great principles. But to Jesus the Golden Rule, while essential, is incomplete without a first principle. Jesus preached the Golden Rule in the Sermon on the Mount. "Therefore, whatever you want men to do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets." (Mat 7:12 NKJV).) Here he is speaking to a large crowd that can't hear him that well and needs a simple guideline.

Later, speaking to religious leaders, he aligns the Golden Rule with the first commandment. In Matthew 22:34-40, "hearing that Jesus had silenced the Sadducees, the Pharisees got together. One of them, an expert in the law, tested him with this question: ‘Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?’ " To this audience, Jesus provides more context: "'Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.' This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: 'Love your neighbor as yourself.' All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments."

The interaction of the two great commandments shows why the second commandment is not sufficient and why God -- an overarching Spirit that connects individual people -- is necessary, even for a functional morality. For example, if we only love our neighbor as ourselves -- and we happen to be filled with hate and rage for ourselves -- then we won't treat our neighbors very well. The Golden Rule can remedy part of this problem by changing the focus from "loving" to "treating" neighbors as we would have them treat us -- thereby imposing our view of ideal behavior and not raw emotion as the standard. But that won't work for some people either, especially those who lack a model of ideal behavior. So, these folks still might act destructively to people around them.

The idea of a single God, or life force, connecting all people creates a vertical pull toward a connecting spirit (the first commandment) to accompany the horizontal equity of the second commandment. Mathematically, the second commandment is nothing more than a simple equation: Love for me = Love for you. The first commandment is a command to maximize Love to the limit of capacity. Without the first commandment, the potential of a person's love would be limited by inherited and culturally absorbed defects and injuries. The two commandments can be seen as consistent with scientific theories of evolution. The first commandment reflects of biological imperative that no individual can carry on life on his or her own. Individuals must interact and communicate with others to continue the stream of life. The Golden Rule suggests that individuals have the freedom to choose the way they interact and communicate with others. Perhaps those with greater faith and sense of fairness are more likely to pass along their genes. --

Karl Polzer, Easter 2017 

"In God We Trust" was adopted as the official motto of the United States in 1956 as an alternative or replacement to the unofficial motto of E pluribus unum, which was adopted when the Great Seal of the United States was created and adopted in 1782. Secularists have expressed objections to its use and have sought to have the religious reference removed from the currency.  Wikipedia, 2015

 

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